AUSTRALIA -Ocean12: Apostles

During our first visit to Melbourne, Australia, when I heard someone mention the words “Twelve Apostles” at the tourism centre, the first thought that crossed my mind was of Jesus and his twelve apostles. Soon I discovered that they were talking about beautiful natural formations of lime stones on the picturesque Grand ocean road. As we both love long drives we instantly booked our seats in a coach leaving the next morning for “The Twelve Apostles”.

We left Melbourne next day and drove for about 5 hours along The Great Ocean Road to reach the twelve apostles by the evening as we were told that view during sunset was a not to be missed event there. Along this route were plenty of opportunities to stop, take pictures and admire the wonders of coastal erosion in the form of famous formations such as the 12 Apostles, London Bridge, Blow Holes, caves and steep cliffs. The drive itself was so exhilarating that we totally lost sense of time through out the journey

The Twelve Apostles are between the towns of Port Campbell and Prince town on the Great Ocean Road. These are limestone sculptures located along the spectacular Great Ocean Road, Victoria. The road itself is 400km long and follows the beautiful Victorian coastline through Port Campbell National Park and beyond to WarrAustralia Snambool.

The Apostles had their beginnings up to 20 million years ago with the forces of nature attacking the soft limestone of the Port Campbell cliffs. The limestone was created through the build up of skeletons of marine creatures on the sea floor. As the sea retreated, the limestone was exposed. The relentless, stormy Southern Ocean, the blasting winds and the constant action of the sea on the limestone slowly wore down the softer limestone, forming caves in the cliffs. The caves eventually became arches and when they collapsed, rock islands up to 45 metres high were left isolated from the shore gradually leaving individual rocks. The cliff is still being eroded at a rate of about 2 cm each year, and in the future is likely to form more ‘Apostles’ from the other rocky headlands that line the Victorian coastline.

Originally they were named the ‘Sow and Piglets’. The Sow was Mutton-bird Island, with the piglets being the smaller surrounding rocks. The name was changed in the 1950s to the more majestic “The Twelve Apostles” to lure more visitors. Over a period of time even a few of them have fallen over entirely as waves continually erode their bases. A 50-metre tall Apostle collapsed on the 3rd July, 2005, which was just a day before our visit. Now there are only eight Apostles left standing.

In the early 2000s a visitor centre was built on the inland side of the road, to allow for easy parking and access to the best viewing area. Visitors to the Twelve Apostles begin their remarkable experience of the towering rock stacks from the interpretative centre. The $5.5 million centre has been designed to blend into the local environment and caters for more than one million people who annually visit the area. A tunnel through which we walked takes you under the Great Ocean Road to the viewing platforms. Extensive board walks and viewing platforms ensure visitors experience sweeping, awe-inspiring vistas and with perfect photo opportunities.

While any time of day provides great views, sunrise and sunset are particularly spectacular for the blazing hues created by rays of the Sun. We were there for an hour or so as the sun sank into the roaring ocean and the light changed, and brought a magic to the scene.

It really was great fun travelling along this route as the scenery was spectacular and there were plenty of great places to stop along the way

I also would like to emphasize that it was worth any amount of driving to get to this sea side and the apostles, in its scale and magnificence, an oceanic grand canyon.

 

During our first visit to Melbourne, Australia, when I heard someone mention the words “Twelve Apostles” at the tourism centre, the first thought that crossed my mind was of Jesus and his twelve apostles. Soon I discovered that they were talking about beautiful natural formations of lime stones on the picturesque Grand ocean road. As we both love long drives we instantly booked our seats in a coach leaving the next morning for “The Twelve Apostles”.

We left Melbourne next day and drove for about 5 hours along The Great Ocean Road to reach the twelve apostles by the evening as we were told that view during sunset was a not to be missed event there. Along this route were plenty of opportunities to stop, take pictures and admire the wonders of coastal erosion in the form of famous formations such as the 12 Apostles, London Bridge, Blow Holes, caves and steep cliffs. The drive itself was so exhilarating that we totally lost sense of time through out the journey

The Twelve Apostles are between the towns of Port Campbell and Prince town on the Great Ocean Road. These are limestone sculptures located along the spectacular Great Ocean Road, Victoria. The road itself is 400km long and follows the beautiful Victorian coastline through Port Campbell National Park and beyond to Warrnambool.

The Apostles had their beginnings up to 20 million years ago with the forces of nature attacking the soft limestone of the Port Campbell cliffs. The limestone was created through the build up of skeletons of marine creatures on the sea floor. As the sea retreated, the limestone was exposed. The relentless, stormy Southern Ocean, the blasting winds and the constant action of the sea on the limestone slowly wore down the softer limestone, forming caves in the cliffs. The caves eventually became arches and when they collapsed, rock islands up to 45 metres high were left isolated from the shore gradually leaving individual rocks. The cliff is still being eroded at a rate of about 2 cm each year, and in the future is likely to form more ‘Apostles’ from the other rocky headlands that line the Victorian coastline.

Originally they were named the ‘Sow and Piglets’. The Sow was Mutton-bird Island, with the piglets being the smaller surrounding rocks. The name was changed in the 1950s to the more majestic “The Twelve Apostles” to lure more visitors. Over a period of time even a few of them have fallen over entirely as waves continually erode their bases. A 50-metre tall Apostle collapsed on the 3rd July, 2005, which was just a day before our visit. Now there are only eight Apostles left standing.

In the early 2000s a visitor centre was built on the inland side of the road, to allow for easy parking and access to the best viewing area. Visitors to the Twelve Apostles begin their remarkable experience of the towering rock stacks from the interpretative centre. The $5.5 million centre has been designed to blend into the local environment and caters for more than one million people who annually visit the area. A tunnel through which we walked takes you under the Great Ocean Road to the viewing platforms. Extensive boardwalks and viewing platforms ensure visitors experience sweeping, awe-inspiring vistas and with perfect photo opportunities.

While anytime of day provides great views, sunrise and sunset are particularly spectacular for the blazing hues created by rays of the Sun. We were there for an hour or so as the sun sank into the roaring ocean and the light changed, and brought a magic to the scene.

It really was great fun traveling along this route as the scenery was spectacular and there were plenty of great places to stop along the way

I also would like to emphasize that it was worth any amount of driving to get to this sea side and the apostles, in its scale and magnificence, an oceanic grand canyon.

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